Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians

7500 Odawa Circle
Harbor Springs, MI 49740
231.242.1400 / 1.866.652.5822

Environmental Services Program


  Brownfields

What is a Brownfield?

The EPA defines a "brownfield site" as real property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.

Elements of a Brownfields Program

1. Timely survey and inventory of Brownfields sites in state or tribal land.

EPA's goal in funding activities under this element is to enable the state or tribe to establish or enhance a system or process that will provide a reasonable estimate of the number, likely locations, and the general characteristics of Brownfields sites in their state or tribal lands

EPA recognizes the varied scope of state and tribal response programs and will not require states and tribes to develop a “list” of Brownfields sites. However, at a minimum, the state or tribe should develop and/or maintain a system or process that can provide a reasonable estimate of the number, likely location, and general characteristics of Brownfields sites within their state or tribal lands.

2. Oversight and enforcement authorities or other mechanisms and resources.

EPA’s goal in funding activities under this element is to have state and tribal response programs that include oversight and enforcement authorities, or other mechanisms, and resources that are adequate to ensure that:

A response action will protect human health and the environment and be conducted in accordance with applicable federal and state law; and the necessary response activities are completed if the person conducting the response activities fails to complete the necessary response activities (this includes operation and maintenance or long-term monitoring activities).

3. Mechanisms and resources to provide meaningful opportunities for public participation.

EPA’s goal in funding activities under this element is to have states and tribes include in their response program mechanisms and resources for public participation, including, at a minimum:

Public access to documents and related materials that a state, tribe, or party conducting the cleanup is relying on or developing in making cleanup decisions or conducting site activities; Prior notice and opportunity for public comment on cleanup plans and site activity; and a mechanism by which a person who is, or may be, affected by a release or threatened release of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant at a Brownfields site—located in the community in which the person works or resides—may request that a site assessment be conducted. The appropriate state or tribal official must consider this request and appropriately respond.

To view a list of currently identified potential brownfield sites, please see the Public Record for 2014.

If you have a concern or possible Brownfield site location that you feel should be addressed, please contact Kevin Hurrell (LTBB Environmental Response Specialist) via email. khurrell@ltbbodawa-nsn.gov

4. Mechanisms for approval of a cleanup plan and verification and certification that cleanup is complete.

EPA’s goal in funding activities under this element is to have states and tribes include in their response program mechanisms to approve cleanup plans and to verify that response actions are complete, including a requirement for certification or similar documentation from the state, the tribe, or a licensed site professional to the person conducting the response action that the response action is complete. Written approval by a state or tribal response program official of a proposed cleanup plan is an example of an approval mechanism

 

Public Record last updated November 2014

 


 

Government Center
7500 Odawa Circle
Harbor Springs, MI 49740
231.242.1400
1.866.652.5822
© 2014 Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians